Mindfulness or Sati in Pali means ‘memory’

the ability to keep things in mind - developing self-reflective awareness to see the true nature of our body, feelings, perceptions and thoughts

With the mind in its busy everyday mode, we are often not able to see things with the necessary perspective. We live with a lot of expectations towards ourselves, pressure at work, ambitions in our social life… This can be exciting and beautiful, and it can also be stressful, tiring and emotionally draining.

Meditation and mindfulness brings together a gathering in of attention with a willingness to explore what we actually feel, rather than trying to create what we think our life should be like. When the mind calms down, it becomes clearer to see where we’re acting out of habits, where those patterns of behaviour come from, and what we can do to become more skilful in our thoughts and actions to create balance, ease and clarity in our lives.

Regular live stream session at the Life Centre

 

Meditation class

Tuesdays 12:00 – 12:30

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4 week meditation course live on Zoom

 

Cultivating presence

8 – 29 September 2021
19:50 – 20:50

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Learn to teach meditation – live on Zoom

 

Meditation teacher training

starting 16 September 2021

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Let us not look back in anger or look forward in fear, but look around us with awareness.

 

James Thurber

The roots of mindfulness lie in the Buddhist tradition. The basis for Buddhist philosophy is the acknowledgement that life is inherently stressful and things shift all the time. We don’t need to take this personally – these are simply characteristics of life.

Through practice we develop clarity around our behaviour patterns, habits and actions. We learn to move away from reactivity, from our addiction to experience, expectations towards others, expectations around our life, and cultivate insight or wisdom through self reflective awareness.

Practice helps us to

develop focus, self awareness, and mental stability

meet physical, mental and emotional challenges

adapt to change

gain a more positive outlook

develop empathy and emotional intelligence

become more resilient

reduce stress and anxiety by increasing brain activity in the prefrontal cortex (linked to regulation of emotions)

increase grey matter in the brain (the part of the brain involved in muscle control, sensory perception, memory, emotions, speech, decision making and self control)

decreases brain activity in the amygdala – the part involved in triggering fear (active when we feel stressed)

Cultivate your practice

Yoga and mindfulness retreat in Morocco

5 – 12 June 2021 at Kasbah Africa, Ouirgane

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My practice and teaching

My meditation practice and teaching draws from my background in Vipassana (Insight) – a Buddhist approach to meditation based on the Theravada lineage, but universally valid independent of any religious believes. Developing mindful awareness and a calm abiding in the present moment are central to the practice

In addition to my own home practice, I’ve done many retreats: Usually I spend 3 weeks per year on silent retreats, mainly at Amaravati monastery in Hertfordshire (a Theravada Buddhist monastery in the Thai forest tradition) with Ajahn Amaro or Ajahn Sundara, or with my teacher Burgs. They have definitely been my strongest influences, but I’ve also been influenced by the teachings of S.N. Goenka (and his vipassana retreat), and other teachers, particularly Tara Brach, Jack Kornfield and Rick Hanson.

I teach mindfulness and self-compassion, as part of my regular meditation classes, in dedicated courses over 4-8 weeks, and as part of my yoga retreats.

I’ve trained in yin yoga and mindfulness with Sarah Powers and in mindfulness and self-compassion at 200hr level with MindfulnessUK, accredited by the Counselling and Psychotherapy Central Awarding Body.

For yogacampus I offer a regular 100hr Meditation Teacher Training programme co-taught with Graham Burns.

I am also a yoga teacher and teach privately and in yoga studios in London.